About

Brandon.
Student.Artist.Musician.Athlete.Dad.
Vegan.Cook.Climber.Cyclist.
I share my opinions, advice, suggestions, recipes, inspiration. I reblog what I like.
Bike Blog:
http://crossfix.tumblr.com
Body Art:
http://intheskin.tumblr.com
Design:
http://designmealife.tumblr.com

brandonsequoia@gmail.com

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veganfeast:

Tofu Satay with a Decadent Peanut Sauce by Jeff and Erin’s pics on Flickr.Eat!
veganpizzafuckyeah:

LASAGNA PIZZA! Don’t ask me why I decided to make such a labor-intensive pizza on a day when the heat index topped 100F –

so much sauteing! and the boiling! hot noodles! please dog just let me crawl into a hole filled with ice cream and die!

– but I did and it was totally worth it. Best pizza I’ve had in a while. 180+ minutes to make, less than 8 minutes to eat. NO REGRETS.


Inspired by a pie from Ian’s that I spotted on tumblr, this pizza sports a layer of lasagna as I typically make it: namely, filled with tender, sauteed goodness like mushrooms, garlic, carrots, zucchini, and cauliflower. And cheese. Mozzarella Daiya as far as the tongue can stretch!

To wit, a cross-section:


Just look at all that hot, juicy veggie action! What do vegans eat? THIS, PEOPLE! THIS IS WHAT VEGANS EAT!
Click through for the recipe, yo.

veganpizzafuckyeah:

LASAGNA PIZZA! Don’t ask me why I decided to make such a labor-intensive pizza on a day when the heat index topped 100F –

so much sauteing! and the boiling! hot noodles! please dog just let me crawl into a hole filled with ice cream and die!

– but I did and it was totally worth it. Best pizza I’ve had in a while. 180+ minutes to make, less than 8 minutes to eat. NO REGRETS.

Inspired by a pie from Ian’s that I spotted on tumblr, this pizza sports a layer of lasagna as I typically make it: namely, filled with tender, sauteed goodness like mushrooms, garlic, carrots, zucchini, and cauliflower. And cheese. Mozzarella Daiya as far as the tongue can stretch!

To wit, a cross-section:

2012-05-26 - Lasagna Pizza (Whole) - 0018

Just look at all that hot, juicy veggie action! What do vegans eat? THIS, PEOPLE! THIS IS WHAT VEGANS EAT!

Click through for the recipe, yo.


(via veganpizzafuckyeah)
findvegan:

Peanut Butter Fudge Pretzel Bars by Hannah Kaminsky

findvegan:

Peanut Butter Fudge Pretzel Bars by Hannah Kaminsky


(via findvegan)
findvegan:

Glazed Caribbean Tofu with Sweet Rice

findvegan:

Glazed Caribbean Tofu with Sweet Rice


(via findvegan)
veganpizzafuckyeah:

reblogged from veganhome:

Easy Homemade Vegan Pizza
You’ll need: one portion fresh pizza dough (I bought mine ready made at the grocery store, but you could probably find a recipe online somewhere really easily), one small Japanese eggplant, one bunch of green onions, skinned+canned tomatoes (San Marzano variety with basil), dried basil, six to ten mushrooms, salt, pepper, olive oil.
Preparation instructions: Preheat oven to three hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit. Roll out dough on a cookie sheet. Sprinkle generously with dried basil. Spoon tomato sauce from the can and cut up some tomatoes to put on top. Slice eggplant in quarter inch slices and spread on top of pizza. Slice green onions and spread on top of pizza. Slice mushrooms and put on top of pizza. Your pizza will look like a huge mound of veggies. Do not be intimidated; they will cook down in the oven. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until cooked.

veganpizzafuckyeah:

reblogged from veganhome:

Easy Homemade Vegan Pizza

You’ll need: one portion fresh pizza dough (I bought mine ready made at the grocery store, but you could probably find a recipe online somewhere really easily), one small Japanese eggplant, one bunch of green onions, skinned+canned tomatoes (San Marzano variety with basil), dried basil, six to ten mushrooms, salt, pepper, olive oil.

Preparation instructions: Preheat oven to three hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit. Roll out dough on a cookie sheet. Sprinkle generously with dried basil. Spoon tomato sauce from the can and cut up some tomatoes to put on top. Slice eggplant in quarter inch slices and spread on top of pizza. Slice green onions and spread on top of pizza. Slice mushrooms and put on top of pizza. Your pizza will look like a huge mound of veggies. Do not be intimidated; they will cook down in the oven. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until cooked.


(via veganpizzafuckyeah)
tryvegan:

rustic new potato and bean salad.

abundanceofthings:

today’s lunch: chick peas with mushrooms and rice

veganskinnybitch:

fuckyeah-tonedandfit:

THE BENEFITS OF SUGAR IN FRUITS
This idea that fruit is somehow a bad thing to eat came into full swing with the low carb diet craze, but the myth persists. Not a week goes by that I don’t hear someone tell me that they avoid fruit because it’s “all sugar” or “loaded with carbs.” So, I want to set the record straight and come to the defense of some of the world’s healthiest foods – fresh, whole fruits.
I’ll tackle the “fruit is all sugar” statement first – because it’s just plain wrong. Fresh fruit offers so much more than the natural sugar it contains – including water, vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytonutrients (those naturally-occurring plant compounds that have wide ranging beneficial effects on the body). Where else can you get a package like that for about 75 calories per serving?
The idea that fruit is “loaded with carbs” or is “full of sugar” needs to be put into perspective, too. It’s true that when you eat fruit, the overwhelming majority of the calories you consume are supplied by carbohydrate – mostly in the form of fructose, which is the natural sugar in the fruit.
But that’s the nature not just of fruit, but of all plant foods – they’re predominantly carbohydrate (and that means not just natural sugars, but healthy starches as well as structural elements, like cellulose, that provide fiber). When you eat vegetables, the majority of the calories you’re eating come from carbohydrate, too. But you don’t hear people complaining that vegetables are “loaded with carbs.”
Before dismissing foods as being loaded with sugar, or too high in carbs, consider not only the amount of sugar or carbs you’re eating, but the form of the carbohydrate, too. There’s a big difference between the nutritional value of the natural carbohydrates found in fruits and other plant foods – the sugars, starches and fibers – and what’s found (or, more accurately, what’s not found) in all the empty calories we eat from added sugars that find their way into everything from brownies to barbecue sauce.
Faced with a serving of fruit, how much sugar are we talking about, anyway? An average orange has only about 12 grams of natural sugar (about 3 teaspoons) and a cup of strawberries has only about 7 grams – that’s less than two teaspoons. And either way, you’re also getting 3 grams of fiber, about a full day’s worth of vitamin C, healthy antioxidants and some folic acid and potassium to boot – and it’ll only cost you about 50 or 60 calories. “All sugar?” I think not.
By contrast, a 20-ounce cola will set you back about 225 calories and, needless to say, won’t be supplying any antioxidants, vitamins, minerals or fiber. You’ll just be chugging down some carbonated water, maybe some artificial color and flavor, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 60 grams of added sugar (about 1/3 of a cup).
You won’t get fat on eating fruit. You won’t be consuming an insane, over-the-top amount of sugar. Don’t be afraid of eating fruit, because they are the best thing you can give your body.

You all need to read this right now. 

veganskinnybitch:

fuckyeah-tonedandfit:

THE BENEFITS OF SUGAR IN FRUITS

This idea that fruit is somehow a bad thing to eat came into full swing with the low carb diet craze, but the myth persists. Not a week goes by that I don’t hear someone tell me that they avoid fruit because it’s “all sugar” or “loaded with carbs.” So, I want to set the record straight and come to the defense of some of the world’s healthiest foods – fresh, whole fruits.

I’ll tackle the “fruit is all sugar” statement first – because it’s just plain wrong. Fresh fruit offers so much more than the natural sugar it contains – including water, vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytonutrients (those naturally-occurring plant compounds that have wide ranging beneficial effects on the body). Where else can you get a package like that for about 75 calories per serving?

The idea that fruit is “loaded with carbs” or is “full of sugar” needs to be put into perspective, too. It’s true that when you eat fruit, the overwhelming majority of the calories you consume are supplied by carbohydrate – mostly in the form of fructose, which is the natural sugar in the fruit.

But that’s the nature not just of fruit, but of all plant foods – they’re predominantly carbohydrate (and that means not just natural sugars, but healthy starches as well as structural elements, like cellulose, that provide fiber). When you eat vegetables, the majority of the calories you’re eating come from carbohydrate, too. But you don’t hear people complaining that vegetables are “loaded with carbs.”

Before dismissing foods as being loaded with sugar, or too high in carbs, consider not only the amount of sugar or carbs you’re eating, but the form of the carbohydrate, too. There’s a big difference between the nutritional value of the natural carbohydrates found in fruits and other plant foods – the sugars, starches and fibers – and what’s found (or, more accurately, what’s not found) in all the empty calories we eat from added sugars that find their way into everything from brownies to barbecue sauce.

Faced with a serving of fruit, how much sugar are we talking about, anyway? An average orange has only about 12 grams of natural sugar (about 3 teaspoons) and a cup of strawberries has only about 7 grams – that’s less than two teaspoons. And either way, you’re also getting 3 grams of fiber, about a full day’s worth of vitamin C, healthy antioxidants and some folic acid and potassium to boot – and it’ll only cost you about 50 or 60 calories. “All sugar?” I think not.

By contrast, a 20-ounce cola will set you back about 225 calories and, needless to say, won’t be supplying any antioxidants, vitamins, minerals or fiber. You’ll just be chugging down some carbonated water, maybe some artificial color and flavor, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 60 grams of added sugar (about 1/3 of a cup).

You won’t get fat on eating fruit. You won’t be consuming an insane, over-the-top amount of sugar. Don’t be afraid of eating fruit, because they are the best thing you can give your body.

You all need to read this right now. 


(via vegpocalypsenow)